06/30/17

Miranda July / Joanie-for-Jackie Film Archive

One of my early films “Day Ditty”  (1997) was recently acquired by the Getty Museum as a part of Miranda July’s Joanie-for-Jackie feminist film archive. See the page here

A devotion to women and their complexities is at the heart of all of the creative endeavors undertaken by Miranda July, the artist, writer, filmmaker — and radically motivated movie mogul. The latter gig, begun in 1995, was inspired by the Riot Grrrl scene then raging in Portland, Ore. Frustrated by the casual misogyny of mainstream and indie films, July, who had routinely built communities around herself, launched the feminist video series Big Miss Moviola (later changed to Joanie 4 Jackie); the hope was to offer an antidote to Hollywood’s disinterest in the lives of women, and to open up a dialogue among girls, as music and fanzines were doing in the mid-’90s. Joanie 4 Jackie quietly thrived until the early 2000s, providing an intimate, easy and invaluable way for female artists to reveal and share their lives.

Twenty-two years after the project began, the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles has acquired the Joanie 4 Jackie collection (some 300 videos, documentation and press materials) from July, contextualizing the project within feminist and queer history, alongside the archives of, among others, the Guerrilla Girls and Robert Mapplethorpe.”

-New York Times, January 30th 2017 –  full article here

06/30/17

Sacred Object Project @ Our Prime Property

This idea came to me of relating to each other through aesthetic dialogue: symbolic artifacts in diverse cultures that, through association, acknowledge a borderless love of beauty, skill, and human expression. To locate the intersections of iconography and create equalized value across time and place, extending beyond regions and beliefs. The works become meditations on form pulled from their context and re-imagined within association…reducing and enlarging disparate items to the same scale and material to neutralize their worth and social/economic significance.

To see more: OPP Website

 

11/28/14

Two Versions of the Same Scroll

longscroll, 40 inches x 20 feet long

longscroll

longscroll2

 

Scroll

marscroll, 40 inches x 20 feet long

this longscroll was used in an installation for the Longhouse Project with Sarah Walko, in the show The Last Supper at 3rd Ward, Brooklyn, and for a film backdrop for director Victor Ruano